Top down shot of a grey bottle with an embossed gold cap, positioned on the corner of a rectangle of grey card, which is a batch certificate from Meadows Gin.

Gin Review: Meadows Gin

If you grew up in certain parts of Trafford – Urmston, Flixton, Stretford, or Davyhulme, you’ll have memories of Urmston Meadows. They may be of walks, or picnics with the family in the sunshine. Maybe you rode your horse across the fields, raced your bikes, or walked the dog. Or maybe there were hazy summer memories of the school holidays getting up to stuff you maybe shouldn’t have. 

It’s one of those places that allows you to escape, without actually going very far. It’s a hop skip and jump away from the hustle and bustle of the town centre, but you can’t hear the traffic, smell the petrol, or even see it (well except for a tower block, but still). 

Whilst Meadows Gin isn’t gin isn’t actually made on the Meadows – or with them for that matter, it is inspired by them, and perhaps the adventures of the gents behind the Northern Spirits Partnership on them. But I can neither confirm nor deny. Nor can I confirm or deny that it was whilst enjoying a G&T or two from a tin, they wondered if they could create something themselves. Something that was perhaps a little… Better than their gin in a tin. 

Turns out, they could. After a little research, they partnered with a master distiller to make a gin that has hints of meadow florals, but remains a light, citrus led western style gin.  The botanicals, juniper (of course), coriander, angelica, liquorice, orange, lemon, lime, orris, cassia, cinnamon, nutmeg and cucumber, are added to the spirit, and left to macerate. This allows the alcohol to break down the cell walls of the botanicals, releasing their natural oils before distillation. 

 

Image of a grey bottle decorated with gold flowers and birds, alongside a silver jigger and a short cut crystal glass containing gin, with a white background.

 

It’s bottled at 42%, and every iteration of batch one comes with it’s own certificate to commemorate the release of the spirit – something tells me this won’t be the only spirit they’ll be releasing. 

So let’s give it a sample. 

Neat on the nose are florals, herbal notes and citrus. Soft, green, fresh. One the palate it’s a big waft of citrus and juniper, lots of green earthy notes. It’s a little tight, but that’s nothing a splash of tonic, or a cube of ice wouldn’t help. That said, it’s very easy to drink neat and I suspect it would work really well in a Martini, or a light and refreshing Tom Collins. 

 

Image of a grey bottle decorated with gold flowers and birds, alongside a silver jigger, slices of lemon and a gin copa glass filled with gin tonic and ice, with a white background.

 

In a G&T the nose is all soft citrus, juniper waves gently in the background. On the palate there’s lots of citrus, earthy base, soft round lime notes, lemon and juniper higher up. 

It’s light, refreshing and clean, and as a bit of a citrus head, I love the soft lime notes, and a strip of lemon peel (their recommended garnish) emphasises both the citrus and the florals in the gin. It’s definitely a gin to go easy on the tonic with – it doesn’t need more than a splash or two to open it up.

 

Top down image of a grey bottle with a gold embossed top, next to a silver jigger, slices of lemon and a gin copa glass filled with gin tonic and ice, with a white background.

 

It’s definitely one I’ll enjoy sipping, and playing with. I can’t wait to see what else these gents have in mind.

 

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This gin was provided free of charge for review purposes. 

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